Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th International Conference and Expo on Nanoscience and Molecular Nanotechnology ROME, ITALY.

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Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Ewa-Kicko Walczak

Institute for Engineering of Polymers Materials and Dyes, Poland

Keynote: Flame retardants nanocomposites: Synergy effect of combining conventional antypirenes with carbon nanofillers

Time : 9:30-10:10

OMICS International NanoScience 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ewa-Kicko Walczak photo
Biography:

Ewa Kicko Walczak graduated from Polytechnic University in Warsaw, Chemical Department. In 1979, she started working in Industrial Chemistry Research Institute. In 1985, she was recipient of Doctor Technical Science title from ICHRI; and in 2012, she received a DSc Chemistry Faculty of Cracow University. Since 2010, she started to cooperate with The Institute for Engineering of Polymers Materials and Dyes (IIMPaD) and since 2015 is General Director of IIMPaD. She completed International Centre of Physics and Chemistry in Ferrara-Roma (Italy) and International Professional Course for Managers of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Industry in Copenhagen (Denmark)-Washington (US). She is the author of more than 80 original research publications and author 90 scientific presentations in international conferences. She is also author (or co-author) of 65 patents/patent applications. She has coordinated Polish and international conferences, 23 research projects oriented towards new polymer materials. Her scientific activity concentrates on ecological aspect of technology and modification polymeric materials, particularly on fire retardant and reduced smoke toxic emission from thermoset resins systems.

Abstract:

The thermoset resins are proven construction materials for the technical and highly demanding applications. Heat stability, high thermal, low shrinkage, mechanical properties are typical for their type of polymers. Above applications also requires a good flame retardant (FR). Undertaken activities refer to official draft recommendations in UE states. This paper presents positive effect of reduced flammability of thermoset resins thanks to the use of nanocomposites containing multi-ingredient halogen-free flame retardants which combine phosphorus/nitrogen modifiers interacting with nanofillers: Expandable graphite (EG), graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO) and anthracite (AN). The flame retardancy of modified polymers has been investigated by LOI analysis, TG and by using CC method. The fine-plates, phase morphology of nanocomposites were assessed by SEM. We confirm that nanocomposite formation is an important concept for the flame retardants industry. Laminates made of modified resins meet requirement LOI over 28-34% and reduced 30-70% head release rate (HRR) by CC method. No adverse impact on strength properties was observed. A multi-ingredient combination of FR turned out to make significant progress in achieving a desired flammability. It should be assumed that the presence of conventional flame retardants led to a synergy effect promoting faster formation of a protection layer hindering oxygen flow-through resulting from the process of thermal destruction

Keynote Forum

Disalvo Anibal

Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Argentina

Keynote: The interaction of nano-archeasomes with lung surfactant in monolayer biomimetic systems

Time : 10:10-10:40

OMICS International NanoScience 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Disalvo Anibal photo
Biography:

Disalvo Anibal is a specialist in Biophysical Chemistry of Lipid Membranes. The interest of research is the role of water in the structural and functional properties of biomembranes applying infrared, fluorescence spectroscopies, electrochemical methods and analysis of kinetic and thermodynamics of surface phenomena in lipid monolayers both experimentally and theoretically. He is currently working as a full Professor of Physical Chemistry and Biophysical Chemistry, University Santiago del Estero, Argentina from 2011. He is Supervisor of 16 PhD Doctorandus from 1984 till now. He published 2 books, 20 chapters and more than 150 papers in international journals. He is a member of the following organizations: Research Career of National Research Council (CONICET), Argentina; Member “ad hoc” of the Academy of Science, Argentina; Editorial Board of Chemistry and Physics of Lipids

Abstract:

Archaeosomes (ARC) are lipid vesicles composed by polar archaeolipids (TPA) extracted from hyperhalopileachae bacteria. In an "in vivo" context, inhaled ARC must first interact with the pulmonary surfactants (PS) lining layer covering the internal surface of the alveolus. Interactions of ARCs with the PS film determine the subsequent retention and translocation of the inhaled ARC and hence their potential activity on target cells. As in the respiratory cycle, the surface pressure of the surfactant monolayer changes, interaction was measured at different initial surface pressures. The changes were pronounced at low surface pressure (10 mN/m), where ARCs produce a much more noticeable effect in comparison to than hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine liposomes (L). Moreover, ARC incorporation rate into the PS membrane was two-fold effective when they were added from the air phase above the monolayer in comparison to when they were injected in the aqueous subphase underneath it. This makes ARC excellent candidates for delivering drugs to the lungs as inhaled nanoliposomes since they appear to interact with the hydrophobic moiety of PS

Keynote Forum

Hitoshi Tabata

University of Tokyo, Japan

Keynote: Energy harvesting form solar light by nano structural controlled iron oxide thin films

Time : 16:10-16:40

OMICS International NanoScience 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hitoshi Tabata photo
Biography:

Hitoshi Tabata received his PhD in 1993 from Osaka University. He was a Professor of Nano- science and Nano-technology Center at Osaka University from 2002 to 2006. After 2006, he became a Professor at The University of Tokyo. He is Vice Chair of Department of Bioengineering and Director of International Center for Nano Electron and Photon Technology. He has published more than 200 papers in reputed journals and has been a Fellow of Japan Society of Applied Physics

Abstract:

Iron oxides are environmental and human-friendly materials. They show various electrical, optical and magnetic properties. Highly spin polarized electron conductivities and unique photovoltaic behaviors are reported in a view point of spintronics technology. The efficient use of solar energy is now one of the great challenges in science and technology. In these days, variety materials have been investigated for use as photo-anodes for water-splitting by sunlight. Among these materials, ferrite oxide such as Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 are regarded as a promising system because of their probabilities of bandgap engineering, which lie well within the visible-IR spectrum, as well as their low costs, electrochemical stabilities and environmental compatibilities. Therefore, a considerable number of studies have been performed on the photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of α-Fe2O3. We have demonstrated that enhanced photocurrent in Rh-substituted α-Fe2O3 thin films are grown by a pulsed laser deposition. The Rh-substituted and V-substituted α-Fe2O3 films were grown on α-Al2O3 (110) substrates with a Ta-doped SnO2 electrode layer by pulsed laser deposition. The optical absorption spectra of the films indicate narrowing of the bandgap with increasing Rh and/or V content. Consequently, the photoelectrochemical performance was improved in the Rh, V-substituted films. We found that the optimum Rh content lies at around x=0.2, where the photocurrent is significantly enhanced over a wavelength range of 340–900 nm. The findings of this research are expected to be useful in the development of the solar fuel conversion systems based on α-Fe2O3.

  • Track 3: Advanced Nanomaterials | Track 4: Nano-Electronics and Microsystems | Track 7: Applications of Nanotechnology | Track 8: Industrial Nanotechnology | Track 11: Nanotechnology for Oil and Gas Industry | Track 15: Medical Nanotechnology in cancer therapy | Track 17: Biomedical Nanomaterials | Track 18: Nanotechnology for environment protection
Location: Rome, Italy
Speaker

Chair

Ewa-Kicko Walczak

Institute for Engineering of Polymers Materials and Dyes, Poland

Speaker

Co-Chair

Alexander Soldatov

Southern Federal University of Russia, Russia

Speaker
Biography:

Damla Ülker is a PhD student at the Department of Polymer Science and Technology of Eskisehir Osmangazi University. She works in various projects based on polymer synthesis and their application studies. Her recent research is based on “Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Microgels, Nanometals, Nanocomposites, Block Copolymer Stabilizers for Related Application Studies”. She has great experience on nanometal dispersion preparation, ATRP chemistry and heterogeneous polymerization techniques including both emulsion and dispersion polymerizations

Abstract:

Poly (ethylene glycol) stabilized stimuli-response microgels have been used as a drug carrier and a release system due to its low toxicity and high biocompatibility nature. They are promising material for the advancement of specific drugs carriers like cancer drugs. They have huge pore size which can be decreased by varying cross-linker ratio. They might be modified with liposome and magnetic nanoparticles as well. Liposome/microgel stimuli-response drug release system may provide better application opportunities such as delivery of multiple components and imaging agents, diagnostic and therapies. In this study, multi-response liposome/microgel hybrid drug delivery and targeting system was synthesized. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) drug was loaded into liposomes in aqueous media, and then a water soluble monomer based multi-responsive microgel hosting liposome-5-FU system was synthesized. Finally, 5-FU loaded hybrid system was covered with magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles in order to provide a response to magnetic field. This hybrid system was used in vitro studies as a drug carrier for a target and controlled drug release system in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4) incubated at 37°C and 42°C and physiological saline solution incubated at 37°C. All microgel, liposome and liposome/microgel systems were characterized by using dynamic light scattering, zetapotentiometer, transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles covered liposome/microgel hybrid system was characterized by using TEM. The release of 5-FU from liposome-microgel hybrid system was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet spectrophotometer detector at 266 nm

Biography:

M M Diah is now pursuing her PhD in Drug Delivery at Non-Destructive Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Research Centre, iPROMISE, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia. She got her Master’s in Chemistry degree (Zeolitic Material Catalysis) in 2002 from Universiti Teknologi Malaysia. She is also a Senior Researcher at Industrial Biotechnology Research Centre, SIRIM Berhad, Malaysia. Her research interests are in bioactives’ isolation from natural product for cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical application and in delivery technology. She has published papers and patents especially for bioactives that are applied in skin whitening products

Abstract:

Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems refer to systems in which drugs are physically incorporated into nanoparticles or nano entities. Nanoparticles, being small with a large specific surface area, increase solubility, enhance bioavailability, improve controlled release and enable precision targeting of the entrapped compounds. In this study, carboxymethyl-oligochitosan (CMoligochitosan) as polymeric permeation enhancer was conjugated to a polar pro-drug, carboxymethyl-5-fluorouracil (CMFU) through succinate linker, to increase the skin drug permeation. CM-oligochitosan-CMFU conjugate was then transformed into nanoparticles (NP) via spray drying technique. Skin drug permeation was profiled through treating the Sprague Dawley rat’s skin (in vitro) with CM-oligochitosan-CMFU NP and CMFU and, had the skin characterized using ATR-Fourier transform infra-red (ATRFTIR)
spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The nanoparticles were characterized by particle size: 229.10±57.05 nm, polydispersity index: 0.60±0.15, zeta potential: -55.92±24.48 mV and drug content: 2.29±0.27% w/w. The level of skin drug permeation of CM-oligochitosan-CMFU NP was higher than CMFU, which had no conjugation to CM-chitosan and nanoparticulation, following 24 hours of study. ATR-FTIR spectra of the untreated skin showed characteristic CH stretching vibrational peaks (asymmetric and symmetric CH2) associated with the lipid alkyl chains of epidermis at 2918.63±0.02 and 2850.56±0.15 cm-1. Similar peaks were not obtainable in skin samples treated with CM-oligochitosan-CMFU NP, while CH peak of lipid was noted in epidermis treated with CMFU. The interaction of CM-oligochitosan-CMFU NP with CH
regime of epidermis could have disrupted and loosened the lipid packing thus facilitating skin drug permeation. Through treating the skin with CM-oligochitosan-CMFU NP, the amide I band of skin was shifted to lower wavelength from 1646.83±1.08 cm-1 to 1642.40±3.72 cm-1 unlike cases of CMFU. The band shift indicated that corneocytes perhaps dehydrated and shrunk, thereby leading to the formation of larger intercellular aqueous pores and better nanoparticles permeation. The ATR-FTIR outcome was furthersupported by thermal and morphological analysis. DSC analysis showed that the melting temperature and enthalpy of endotherm at 65.92±0.570C related to lamellar lipid structure were reduced when the skin was treated with CM-oligochitosan-CMFU NP. The skin lipid packing became disordered and this was not observable in study using CMFU. Using SEM, the skin treated with CMoligochitosan-CMFU NP was characterized with pore formation, while the surfaces of skin remained intact when it was treated with CMFU.

Nekane Guarrotxena

Spanish National Research Council, Spain

Title: Smart organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials: Design and functionality

Time : 10:40-11:00

Speaker
Biography:

Nekane Guarrotxena is a PhD student from the University of Complutense, Madrid-Spain and Post-doctoral researcher at the Ecole Nationale Superieure d´Arts et Metiers (ENSAM), Paris (France) and the University of ScienceII, LEM-Montpellier (France). From 2008-2011, she was visiting Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara (USA) and the CaSTL at the University of California, Irvine (USA). She is currently Research Scientist at the Institute of Polymer Science and Technology (ICTP), CSIC-Madrid (Spain). Her research interest focuses on the synthesis and assembly of hybrid nanomaterials, nanoplasmonics, and their uses in nanobiotechnology applications (bioimaging, biosensing, drug delivery and therapy).

 

Abstract:

The combination of the unique physical properties (light scattering, emission and absorption, and magnetic response) of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with the relevant chemical features derived from the morphology and the microstructure of polymer chains talk by themselves about its key-role played in the development of highly functional nanomaterials and nanocomposites. So far, functional smart polymers are becoming increasingly straightforward to design and synthesize multifunctional nanomaterials with a remarkable range of predictable responses and other properties. A smart polymer, by definition, can convert energy from one form into another by responding to a change in some stimuli (temperature, pH, mechanical strength, or electric and magnetic fields) in its environment. Therefore, smart polymers are used in biotechnology, medicine and engineering, in such applications as drug delivery systems, chemical separation, sensors and actuators. On the basis of the high interest within the scientific community, even when important research has been done along the last years on the effective polymer coating approaches of NPs, the establishment of new protocols for their functionalization is still needed. Within this presentation, we want to highlight the recent progress in their successful integration via multidentate ¨grafting to¨ conjugation which guarantees the highly desirable features, such as compact hydrodynamic size, amphiphilic, pH- and thermo-responsiveness, and enhanced optical properties for future bio- and technological applications of our functional nanohybrid materials. A detailed characterization of these properties will be exposed along

Angelo Monguzzi

Università degli Studi Milano-Bicocca, Italy

Title: Low power up-conversion nano-materials for solar applications and bio-theranostics

Time : 11:20-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Angelo Monguzzi received the PhD degree in Materials Science in 2008 at the University of Milano-Bicocca. He started his research working on hybrid light emitters for telecom, in the framework of several national and international project and networks. The topic of his current research is the triplet-triplet annihilation assisted up-conversion of non-coherent photons in multicomponent organic systems. In 2009, he has been awarded by the Italian Society of Physics. In 2014, he has been Fellow of the Japan Society of the Promotion of Science and he has been awarded with the Edison S.p.A “Physics 2014” Scholarship for the collaboration with the ETH-Zurich in Switzerland

Abstract:

 

Luminescence-based techniques continue to attract considerable attention due to their broad range of applications and to their potential in the fields of optical devices and biomedicine. Many materials exhibit Stokes shift luminescence, thus they emit lower-energy photons under excitation with higher-energy photons. As opposite, photon up-conversion (UC) is a process which leads to the emission of light at energy higher than the absorbed (anti-Stokes shift). UC materials are largely studied for their potential application in solar devices (SD) technology, to recover the low energy tail of the solar emission, and as optical probes for biological imaging, due to the high contrast given by the UC anti-Stokes emission. Therefore, low power triplet-triplet annihilation assisted up-conversion (TTA-UC) in organic systems has been proposed in 2006 as a straightforward strategy to manage photon’s energy. Thanks to its high efficiency with non–coherent excitation, TTA-UC is currently the strongest candidate for application in SD technology with an estimated maximum improvement of the solar cell performance up to 50% for standard photovoltaic devices and 100% for photo-catalytic water splitting cells. On the other hand, TTA-UC based nanoparticles are preferable to inorganic up-converters for the better bio-compatibly of organics and the significantly higher efficiency at low power, reducing the potential damage to the biological environment. Consequently, high-energy blue photons are easy available for drug/contrast agents and chemical reactions activation. A careful analysis of the photophysics involved in the process will be presented, enlightening the guidelines for the development of appealing nanomaterials suitable to be employed as efficient photon up-converters in real applications

Speaker
Biography:

Alexander Soldatov has completed his PhD from Rostov State University (Russia) in 2002 and postdoctoral studies from La Sapienza University (Rome, Italy). He is the director of Smart Materials Research Center at Southern Federal University of Russia. He has published more than 230 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several scientific journals

Abstract:

The study of nanoscale atomic structure of matter is important both from fundamental point of view for the understanding the nature of physical and chemical properties of the materials and for applied research as a basis for the synthesis of novel nanomaterials with the necessary for nano-bio-medical applications properties. To gain deep insight into the nature of the relation “structure-function” one has to use both computer nanodesign and advanced experimental methods for picodiagnostics. The status of modern theoretical analysis of the synchrotron based experimental x-ray absorption spectra to extract local atomic structural parameters is presented. Novel in-situ technique for picodiagnostics - extracting of 3D local atomic structure parameters on the basis of advanced quantitative analysis of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) has been developed. The possibility to extract information on bond angles and bond-lengths (with accuracy up to 1 pm) is demonstrated and it opens new perspectives of quantitative XANES analysis as a 3D local structure probe for any type of materials without long range order in atoms positions (all nanostructured materials and metallo-proteins belong to this class of materials). The nowadays progress in the development of the synchrotron radiation facilities for time dependent measurements opened the possibilities for the study the atomic and electronic structure dynamics as well. The research is supported by the grant of Russian Science Foundation (project 14-35-00051).

Speaker
Biography:

Aziz Habibi-Yangjeh received his PhD in Physical Chemistry/Reaction Kinetics from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 2001. He is currently Full Professor of Physical Chemistry at the University of Mohaghegh, Ardabili. His research interests include preparation of different visible-light-driven photocatalysts based on ZnO and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). He has published more than 85 international refereed journal papers. Moreover, he is reviewer in his area of research for several international journals. Also, he has published two Persian text books

Abstract:

In the present century, human beings face with different challenges, such as environment pollution, energy shortage, and global warming. Heterogeneous photocatalytic processes have attracted a great deal of attention as a promising green technology with potential application to address these challenges. However, generally there are three main drawbacks for efficiently using traditional photocatalysts. Firstly, they cannot sufficiently absorb the solar irradiation, due to their wide band gaps, impeding energy absorptions from the solar energy. Secondly, separation of photocatalysts from the treated solutions by filtration or centrifugation in large scale is not economic. Thirdly, the photogenerated electron-hole pairs recombine with high rate, leading to reduced activity. However, by combination of semiconductors with matching band potentials, the formed nanocomposites can benefit from the synergistic effects of suppressing recombination of the charge carriers and enhancing absorption of the solar radiation. Moreover, magnetic visible-light-driven photocatalysts can provide an effective strategy for separation of photocatalysts from the treated solutions using magnetic field. In this presentation, we will discuss about some novel magnetic nanocomposites prepared by my research group with facile and large-scale method. The prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analysis of X-rays, transmission electron microscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometry techniques. Photocatalytic activities of the nanocomposites were investigated by degradation of different dye pollutants

P Guida

University of Genoa, Italy

Title: Nanofabrication strategies for influencing biomolecule behavior

Time : 12:20-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

P Guida graduated from the University of Genoa in 2003 with a thesis on Biophysics and Dysfunctioning of CLC-channels. In 2008, at the same university, she obtained her PhD in Neurochemistry and Neurobiology (Molecular and Clinical Experimental Biology and Medicine); her thesis being on NMDARs Pathological Modulations. Her working career began in 2002 at the IBF-CNR-Genoa, remaining there until 2007. Since May 2009, she has been a Post-doctoral Researcher at the university's physics department responsible for developing biomimetic platforms for cancer cells, tissue engineering and nanostructures for diagnostic applications. She is co-author of several papers published in numerous international journals

Abstract:

In recent years, nanofabrication techniques have shown themselves to have the most promising potential for innovative research on crucial biomolecules for life sciences, such as DNA and RNA. Two main examples are: Firstly, large-scale nanostructuring, effective for engineering innovative biosensors; and secondly, nanopores, intensively exploited for developing fast and inexpensive technologies for DNA sequencing, a major research challenge in the field of biomedicine. In addition to nanopores, nanoslits and nanochannels allow interesting functionalities for the study, processing and sorting of DNA. For example, when a long DNA chain is forced to enter a nanochannel, it stretches, thus acquiring a conformation which allows its genetic information to be optically read. Herein, we have focused on various geometry-based strategies, involving short and long channels, as well as funnels and a series of pit nanostructures, integrated into polymeric lab-on-a-chip models. We have implemented these miniaturized systems in order to study, at single molecule level, the typical conformations of DNA chains in various nano-confinement conditions whilst also observing the dynamic behavior of the long strands in crossing structures with different cross sections. In fact, by taking advantage of polydimethylsiloxane's elasticity, we have developed a strategy for modulating the translocation dynamics of single molecules crossing a nanochannel. Lastly, we have investigated on important applications for life and material sciences of the recent innovative tool which counts and recognizes nanoparticles through a new simultaneous optical and electrical sensing method.

Mikheil Mebonia

Ilia State University, Georgia

Title: Geometry induced doping in thin Si nano-grating layers

Time : 12:40-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

M Mebonia has completed his Master’s from Ilia State University and started his PhD at the same university collaborated with RWTH Aachen University. Since 2014, he has been working in Research Centre Juelich and Fraunhofer Institute of Laser Technology as a PhD Researcher. From 2013, he has been working in Scientific and Technological Centre "Nano Structured Materials for Renewable Energy" the School of Engineering in Ilia State University. He has published some papers in reputed journals

Abstract:

Recently, new quantum features have been studied in the area of nanostructured layers. Nano-grating on the surface of the thin layer imposes additional boundary conditions on the electron wave function and induces G-doping or geometry doping. G-doping is equivalent to donor doping from the point of view of the increase in electron concentration n. However, there are no ionized impurities. This preserves charge carrier scattering to the intrinsic semiconductor level and increases carrier mobility with respect to the conventionally doped layer. We fabricated Si nano-grating layers and measured their electrical characteristics to monitor geometry induced doping (G-doping). Grating was fabricated using laser interference lithography (375 nm laser) followed by reactive ion etching of Si. Next, large square island (0.3 x 0.3 mm) was shaped in the device layer and 4 SiTiAg ohmic contacts were formed to measure electrical characteristics. The I-V characteristics were recorded using both 4 wire and 2 wire methods. Resistance-temperature r (T) dependences (T=4-300 K) were recorded as well. For all 12 samples, nano-grating layers show 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in resistivity. Resistivity anisotropy was in the range 0.2-1 at 300 K. Obtained geometry induced doping level corresponds to “Effective Impurity” concentration of 3 x 1018 cm-3. The r (T) dependence is in agreement with G-doping theory. It was observed (data from 12 samples) that nano-grating reduces resistivity of Si layer from »10 Ohm cm (plain layer) to 5 x 10-2-8 x 10-3 Ohm cm. This reduction is in agreement with theoretical prediction of G-doping. Value 10-2 Ohm cm corresponds to “Impurity” concentration of 3 x 1018 cm-3 (phosphorous in Si). G-doping does not require ionized impurities. This allows high carrier mobility and temperature independent carrier concentration. Nano-grating fabrication does not require sophisticated technology and can be used for solar cells and other photovoltaic devices, ultra high frequency electronics and power electronics

Speaker
Biography:

Fengguo Fan Southeast University is a PHD student at State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, China. His research field is Nano thin film assembly and  electromagnetic effect

Abstract:

 

Flexibility magnetic is a topic of rapidly growing interest in both the scientific and engineering research due to its numerous potential in a broad range of applications. Previous assembly approaches for 2 dimensional magnetic iron oxide at the nanoscale are used by the layer by layer technology. Here, a strategy is introduced that exploits flexibility material for self-assembly of 2D thin film, and this material can be bent at different angels from 0 to 360. In alternating magnetic field with different elastic deformation of the film, there are obvious differences magnetothermal effects. Vibrating sample magnetometer shows that the material has good anisotropy. Low frequency impedance analyzer test results further demonstrate that it has a good magnetic response. Deformation of the nanoparticle film changed its impedance due to its nanoparticles arrangement. This film has a good hydrophilicity can be used for skin adhesion. Scanning electron micrograph shows that for different nanoparticle film deformation the nanoparticles space from each other has changed. Analysts believe that such particles pitch density that can have a very important effect on the magnetic coupling between the particles, resulting in different deformation having different magnetic response effects. In conclusion, we prepared a flexible nanoparticle film having a magnetic effect and good bio-compatibility. In future it may be used for skin adhesion of administration and control magnetic stimulation

Gilles Le Blevennec

Univ Grenoble Alpes, France

Title: Comprehensive study of ZAIS Nanocrystals photo-physics

Time : 14:00-14:20

Biography:

Graduated from the French, Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Ingénieur Electricien de Grenoble, Electrical engineering school in 1982. Work as Engineer in Alcatel and Crismatec companies before to enter in CEA ( French Governmental Research Center) in 1988. Involved in materials for electromagnetism applications during 8 years, then was responsible of Optical Materials Laboratory at CEA Tours, for 4 years. In 2000, I am promoted Manager of the Material Department in CEA Grenoble. In 2008, I became Senior Expert in the Optical Department

Abstract:

AgInS2-ZnS (ZAIS) nanocrystals are semiconductor phosphors generally used for a variety of applications in the visible domain such as LED lighting, bio-imaging or photovoltaics. This communication is about photo-physics of such a nanoparticle. Those particles behave without quantum confinement, their luminescence has its origin in donor-acceptor pair (DAP) transitions. In afirst step, lifetime of the emissions measured by time resolved spectroscopy will be exploited in order to describe the three radiative mechanisms acting either on surface or in the core of the particle. In a second time, we will combine lifetime and quantum yield measurements to quantify radiative and non-radiative recombination rates. This step is a very powerful method for understanding electronics processes. Indeed, those values associated with other material characterizations (optical absorption and XPS) allows to determine the relationship between structural properties and emission processes. As consequence, we will establish the direct effect of disorder on non-radiative recombinations and identify the element defects involved in the photoluminescence. All these experimental results give a complete analysis of electronics processes occurring in a sub-10nm nano

Speaker
Biography:

Elena Angeli received her PhD in Physics from the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, then she moved to the University of Genova where she started working on Nanofluidics for Biomedical applications, at Nanomed Labs. She has been developing innovative technologies and nanofluidic devices, mainly polymeric, for manipulating DNA molecules at single molecule level. Besides her activity on nanofluidic lab-on-chips, she is also exploring the field of polymeric devices for culturing and handling cells of oncological interest

Abstract:

Single and multiple nanochannels’ devices are powerful tools whose exploitation covers various field of application. Slightly modifying the characteristics of a basic structure like a nanochannel, it is possible to investigate a variety of different phenomena: conformational change in biopolymers, nanoparticles’ translocation processes. For example: devices with multiple nanochannels can be used for stretching long DNA moleucles for bar coding applications , while nanochannels interrupted by series of deep regions can be used as entropic traps for studying the dynamics conformational changes in biopolymers. Devices with short single channels are used for counting and sizing nanoparticles one-by-one exploting an electro-optical tracking method recently developed by our laboratory. This technique is based on the simultaneous acquisition of electrical traces and optical tracks of nanoparticles crossing the nanochannel. This multimodal analysis approach greatly increases the reliability of these sensors, compared to conventional monomodal approaches, in counting and sizing nanoparticles of different nature. The versatility of these nanodevices makes them very valuable tools for several areas of Nanotechnology

Speaker
Biography:

Cansel Tuncer completed her PhD at Eskisehir Osmangazi University in 2015. She has been working as a Research Assistant at the same university since 2009. She has published 7 papers in reputed journals. She has worked as Researcher on various projects based on biotechnology and polymer technology. She is currently working on 2 projects as a Director. She has great experience on the synthesis of polymers and their derivatizations, hydrogels, microgels, nanoparticles and metal production by using various methods including GTP, ATRP, free radical polymerization and heterogen polymerization techniques

Abstract:

Waste water treatment is a huge problem in many industrial sectors. There are various pollutants in waste water such as dyes, heavy metals, pharmaceuticals and phenols. Dyes are complex organic compounds and mainly classified into cationic, non-ionic and anionic groups. They are used in great numbers of industries as coloring agents. Various physical and chemical methods have been investigated for the removal of dye contaminants. Most commonly used methods are adsorption, biological degradation, coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, ozonation, chemical precipitation, reverse osmosis, etc. Polymeric materials are often used and play an important role in waste water applications. Herein, new types of highly cross-linked (HCL) polymers were synthesized from a tertiary amine methacrylate based monomers (DMA, DEA, DPA and GMA) as a dye adsorbent. Systematically, the effect of pH change on dye adsorption and the adsorption capacity of related polymers were determined. Adsorption isotherms were analyzed to understand dye-polymer interactions. From related isotherm, kinetic adsorption rate of the polymer-dye system and thermodynamical parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were calculated. Secondly, dye molecules were extracted from aqueous phase. Host-guest relationship (between copolymer and dye molecules) was used as a method for extracting. Since HCL polymers have cavities and functional groups, dye molecules were easily pulled from the aqueous phase to the organic phase. Extraction capacities of HCL polymers were calculated from UV-Vis spectrophotometer data

Hsien Ting Chiu

National Tsing Hua University, Republic of China

Title: Albumin-gold nanorods based core-shell nanoplatforms for cancer theranostics

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Hsien Ting Chiu has completed his Bachelor’s degree from National Tsing Hua University at the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences in 2012. He is now a PhD student in National Tsing Hua University in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences. His research is focused on nanomaterial design for cancer application

Abstract:

Over the past two decades, the rapid development of albumin- and gold nanostructures-based nanoplatforms offer promising solutions to address numerous scientific difficulties in cancer research such as drug delivery, tumor targeting and cancer therapy. In this study, a hybrid system ([email protected]) was designed for theranostic nanomedicine through chemically cross-linking of serum albumin (SA) shell outside the core of gold nanorod (Au NR). A tremendous amount of anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX) could also be encapsulated inside the SA shell via physical adsorption during the formation of [email protected]:DOX. Our results demonstrated that the SA shell exhibited a great impact on the photoacoustic signal generation, leading to a strong contrast enhancement in photoacoustic imaging of tumor cells. Delivered [email protected]:DOX with higher DOX loading exhibited greater killing efficacy while the photothermal effect induced by the near-infrared laser irradiation also greatly improved the therapeutic efficacy of DOX against tramp-C1 prostate carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that the development of core-shell nanoplatform, [email protected] is highly promising as an integrated theranostic nanoagent for further clinical applications

Güncem Özgün Eren

Yıldız Technical University, Turkey

Title: Conservation Of Historical Documents With Silver/Chitosan Nanocomposite

Time : 15:20-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Güncem Özgün Eren got Bachelor’s degree and Master’s degree from Metallurgy and Material Engineering Department at Yıldız Technical University, İstanbul, Turkey. During his Undergraduate and Graduate studies, he has studied some projects about nanotechnology as ‘developing gas sensors’, ‘anti-viral and anti-microbial masks’ and ‘conservation historical documents’. Also, he has done researches in archaeometallurgy and has published a paper about this situation in Journal of Turkish Studies-Harvard University. He has finished his Master’s in December 2015 and right now is doing PhD in Bioengineering Department at the same university

Abstract:

‘History is teacher of life’ as Romans expressed. It is a very significant matter of fact which contains the past, the present and the future of the societies, also has a very important place in improving the social consciousness. One of the most important duty of the mankind is to protect such a worthy history heritage. Archives that are made by paper are one of the main parts of our past. Paper can be deteriorated due to physical, chemical and biological based factors such as acidity, metal ions, lightning, heat, humidity, UV light, pollutants or biodeteriogens. Among these factors, for one, microorganisms can damage on papers irrevocably via releasing some reactive groups. This study is focused on conservation of historical paper samples by using silver-chitosan nano composite coating to gain antibacterial and antifungal feature. It is well known that Ag nanoparticles possess antibacterial properties. Chitosan, a polysaccharide biopolymer derived from naturally occurring chitin, displays unique polycationic, chelating and film forming properties due to the presence of active amine and hydroxyl functional groups, and is a natural polymer that is both non-toxic and biodegradable. Silver-chitosan nano composite produced at specific temperature via solvothermal method. Then, produced samples are characterized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Coating of sample papers are carried out by using three different methods that are called dipping, spraying and electrospinning. Afterwards, micro-organism growth was tested in Süleymaniye Manuscript Library

Speaker
Biography:

Elena Kuchma graduated from Faculty of Physics at Southern Federal University of Russia. She is a Master student at Southern Federal University and assistant for director of Smart Materials International Research Center

Abstract:

Nowadays one of the most important research field is the application of magnetic nanoparticles for theranostics in oncology (contrast agent for MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and active material for Magnetic Hyperthermia treatment). Development of novel advanced nanomaterials for biomedical applications is limited to a great extent by the lack of cutting-edge characterization techniques of both nanoparticles themselves and their spatial distribution in biological tissues after administration. A possibility of fine tuning of these nanoparticles characteristics in size, shape and specific magnetic characteristics should be realized. For the manufacture of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles having tuneable magnetic and biochemical properties advanced micro-wave synthesis technique was used, thus preparing a bases for future personalized nanomedicine platform. To get detailed insight into the relationships between parameters of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles (size, morphology, stoichiometry, type of surfactant covering the nanoparticles) and their magnetic and biochemical properties advanced in-situ x-ray spectroscopic methods were applied. Iron oxide based colloidal magnetic nanoparticles for theranostics in oncology are promising candidates for nanomedical applications as one could use them both for diagnostics (as a contrast agent in MRI) and simultaneously for therapy (as active agent for magnetic hyperthermia of tumour tissues). In the present study advanced synchrotron radiation x-ray spectroscopiс methods were used for in-situ study of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles in solution, reproducing their “natural” conditions in biological tissues. Highenergy-resolution XANES and non-resonant XES obtained at ESRF ID26 beamline were applied to study the atomic and electronic structures of the colloidal nanoparticles in both occupied and unoccupied electronic states regions. High energy resolution XAFS, obtained through selective fluorescence detection was treated by using of advanced FitIt theoretical approach to obtain the 3D local structure parameters exploiting the improved full-potential FDMNES code